Archives for Retirement

How Rich Do You Have to Be in Order to Retire?

Even though perceptions have changed during the pandemic with more Americans now saying they need less money to feel rich1, when it comes to retirement, most people are still unclear about how much they will need to have saved before they can quit their jobs. The answer to that question is different for every person. Here are some of the things you need to think about in order to get a realistic retirement number in mind.   What do you want to do during retirement? Where will you live? Different people have different retirement goals and visions. You may not
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Categories: Retirement and Retirement Planning.

Clearing Up Confusion About RMDs

The SECURE Act has increased the age for required minimum distributions (RMDs) from 70-1/2 to 72 starting this year, 2020. If you turned age 70-1/2 in 2019, your RMDs were required for the 2019 tax year, and WILL BE required for 2020, 2021 and every year from now on. For everyone turning 70-1/2 in 2020, your RMDs will not be required until the year you turn 72, even if you have received notification from your custodian to the contrary. Because the law was passed and became effective within two weeks of passage, automated computer notifications and settings have not been
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Categories: Retirement and Tax Planning.

The Rules Are Changing For 401(k)s In 2020

The Rules Are Changing For Your 401(k) In 2020 If you’re still working and contributing to a 401(k) or similar workplace retirement plan, there is some good news for the upcoming year. If you’re under age 50, the amount you can contribute to your 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan is now $19,500 for 2020—a $500 increase over 2019. Additionally, for those who are age 50 or over by December 31, 2020, the catch-up amount is now $6,500, up by $500 (and the first increase since 2015). Keep in mind that you can still
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Categories: Retirement and Retirement Planning.

Does Your Retirement Plan Include Inflation Risk?

Inflation may not always be top of mind when you think about planning for retirement. Of course, you will likely consider your current expenses, but you need to account for what the costs of those expenses could be over time. None of us can predict the future, but we can plan. Inflation diminishes purchasing power over the years and increases the costs of services that retirees and pre-retirees need. Given that more Americans are living longer, it can pay dividends to include inflation risk in your overall planning. The other issue we have to contend with when it comes to
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Categories: Retirement and Retirement Planning.

The IRA Had a Birthday Last Month

The IRA can provide many gifts as part of a comprehensive retirement plan. The Individual Retirement Account (IRA) turned 45 on Labor Day. On September 2, 1974, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, or ERISA, was enacted into law, introducing broad safeguards to protect employee savings in both defined benefit plans like pensions, and defined contribution plans. The intent of Congress in initially establishing IRAs was to provide a tax-advantaged retirement savings plan for those workers at businesses that weren’t able to offer pensions. The IRA also made it possible to preserve the tax-deferred status of qualified plan assets when
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Categories: Retirement and Retirement Planning.

Congress Looks to Provide More Options for Retirement Savers

While changes to traditional IRAs, RMDs offer some benefits, there are tradeoffs. Broad proposals are in the works in the retirement savings arena to ease rules on tax-deferred savings vehicles, make it easier for employers to offer 401(k)-type savings plans and also convert balances into annuities for lifetime income. In late May, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (SECURE). Key provisions within the SECURE Act offer more flexibility for when distributions would have to be taken out of tax-deferred accounts. On the flip side, the Act takes direct aim
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Categories: Retirement and Tax Planning.

Women and Social Security: Do you really know your benefits?

Social Security guidelines for retirement benefits were established all the way back in the 1930’s and were founded on a traditional family situation1. With marriage patterns and caregiving needs constantly evolving, the modern woman could be at a disadvantage if strategic retirement planning is not properly implemented. While Social Security is gender-neutral and individuals with identical earnings histories are treated equally in terms of benefits, the reality of the matter is that women face greater economic challenges than men do when it comes to retirement for a number of reasons2. For example, women tend to live longer than men, but
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Categories: Retirement and Social Security.

5 Things to Know About Long-Term Care

November is long-term care (LTC) awareness month. Here are five things you should know.   There are different types of facilities providing increasing levels of care.1 If you hear the words “long-term care” and automatically think “nursing home,” you should know that long-term care encompasses a wide range of options and a progression of choices. The most self-sufficient seniors might live in independent retirement living facilities, while assisted living often adds medication management, daily personal care, meals and housekeeping. Continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) offer a tiered approach so that seniors can transition on site as they require more services.
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Categories: Long Term Care and Retirement.

Top 5 Things Baby Boomers Should Know

The Social Security COLA (cost of living adjustment) in 2019 will be 2.8%. This is the largest COLA increase from the Social Security Administration since 2012.1 Social Security benefits are often taxed. If you work and are at full retirement age or older, you can earn as much as you want and your benefits will not be reduced; however, you may have to pay taxes on them. If your annual combined income is from $32-$44,000 filing jointly, you may have to pay taxes on 50% of your benefits. If your income is more than $44,000 filing jointly, then you may
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Categories: Lifestyle and Retirement.